The Lifetime Worrier

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​But strive first for the kingdom of God and his righteousness, and all these things will be given to you as well. So do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will bring worries of its own. Today’s trouble is enough for today.-Matthew 6:33-34.  

I am a worrier. That is who I am. I have spent countless hours and days worrying about the most outlandish things that are so over the top, that they are beyond the ceilings that I will ever have to reach. My deepest worries have never really become realities, but my mind has the greatest imaginations and is at its most creative when in doubt. I’ve studied and meditated over scripture countless times and have seen how God has worked in providing for my daily needs consistently. Yet those passages become irrelevant when facing the challenges of life, because I reject the true presence of the…

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The Lifetime Worrier

​But strive first for the kingdom of God and his righteousness, and all these things will be given to you as well. So do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will bring worries of its own. Today’s trouble is enough for today.-Matthew 6:33-34.  

I am a worrier. That is who I am. I have spent countless hours and days worrying about the most outlandish things that are so over the top, that they are beyond the ceilings that I will ever have to reach. My deepest worries have never really become realities, but my mind has the greatest imaginations and is at its most creative when in doubt. I’ve studied and meditated over scripture countless times and have seen how God has worked in providing for my daily needs consistently. Yet those passages become irrelevant when facing the challenges of life, because I reject the true presence of the Holy Spirit. Like many of us, societal forces and pressures make worry a consistent habit that is impossible to break, and make faith and trust in God a deep theoretical and theological concept, but not a timeless criteria to practice and walk with throughout the journeys and struggles of life.

Worry is a very “normal” emotion that we all exhibit on a regular basis. We worry about the safety and security of our loved ones and the stability of our lived existence. The notion of “not worrying” seems like a foreign and unrealistic philosophy that makes us cringe and uneasy, because few things feel less humane and more mystic than being still and trusting in God.

Worry has always been an emotion that humans have expressed. Yet it has appeared to have increased as technology advances, inequality accumulates, and information accelerates. We are more exposed and experienced with tragedy and injustice, because it is embedded in our psyche on a daily basis and keeps us at ease and on the edge on life.

Yet the very fact that worrying is second nature, being the bread and butter to our existence, exposes how distrusting and disengaged our hearts are towards God and raises questions about our commitments to the kingdom. Furthermore, it is one of the clearest examples of our reliance and dependence on our limited and shallow understandings of life. How can we say that we love God when we don’t fully trust him? Why do we fool ourselves into believing that an unknown and unnamed force in society is greater than the God that rules the heavens and the earth? It is because our arrogance and ignorance allows us to, because the gods of society tell us to.

As Christians, we are supposed to trust God by seeking his kingdom first above all. How do we do that in a world where that very message and teaching is contradicted by the folkways and mores that we witness in our society? How do we refrain from living consumed with compulsion and begin exiting the embracement of the feeling that we are not enough?

Refraining from worry is so much easier said than done and it feels like an impossible task to handle. This is why it is essential to simply seek God first, his presence, his power, and his prominence. There are so many circumstances and powers that regularly consume us and easily control us and alone, we cannot handle the harm that hammers us daily. Through our own human reasoning and will, we cannot live by any trust or faith in God. By seeking God first and constantly surrendering to and trusting in him, we can live free of the fervent fear and worry that wrap and clothe us daily. Seek God and trust him. It will set you free from the many worries and trials of this life.

The Death of Character

The essence of character is behavior, morality, and good will. Character is encompassed in one’s thoughts, words, and deeds and is not reduced to the quantifiable standards that so often measure success. Nor is it confined to the visible metrics used to determine one’s personality and fit for roles and responsibilities. Rather character is what is not seen, easily measured, or often valued. Character does not sustain fame or secure multi-million dollar deals. Nor does it usually result in being the face of movements or social change. Character is valued in principle but not in practice, because the forces in our society are as superficial as the surface of land and as marketable as pseudo pornography on film and social media.

Character cannot be developed or improved by conforming to and being consumed by the folkways and mores of elite. In American society for example, the core values are wealth and individualism, which are aspects of the American dream. These values say nothing about character and consequently, few people strive for or speak on the need for good character, as it pertains to the goals of life. Even in our religious institutions, there is an individualized focus that encourages self-fulfillment and satisfaction above humility, honesty, and other character-centered ideals.

The lack of character in our society is seen when looking at social media posts or reading blogs and articles. It is heard when listening to politicians spew raw garbage that creates long term litter which is eaten up by rats that are attracted to pure rubbish. It is felt when you walk through universities and churches, tasted through the bitterness that has inflicted so much of humanity, and smelt through the nastiness in the elite circles across America.

Those who exhibit strong character endure challenges living in an age of chronic consumerism and cut throat commercialism. The superficiality that is upon us suffers from any attempt at being sincere and sells people to shackles of financial, commercial, and emotional slavery. While future generations could witness innovations and individual successes never dreamed of by our forefathers and fore-mothers, the character drought and famine that will inflict our land will make people even more numb to pain and suffering, and will transform faith and religion into thought processes to ponder and pick and choose from when convenient. Activism and voluntarism will be reduced to snap chats and video clips while the cries of the oppressed will continue to go unheard. Loneliness will skyrocket in leaps and bounds and a sense of community will become extinct, because accountability will turn into a taboo concept that controls and limits people’s ability be independent. The thickness and closeness of family will never be more thin and “God” will be reduced to and thought of as an outdated intellectual theory. That will signify the death of character in our society.